McCormick Place

I had an opportunity to attend the American Telemedicine Association 2018 Conference (ATA18), in Chicago, Illinois, at McCormick Place. The annual gathering brings together healthcare professionals, business professionals, and leaders in different areas of healthcare and technology and occurred from Sunday April 29 to Tuesday May 1, 2018. ATA18 was billed as the world’s largest telehealth networking event with a focus on the latest innovations. The term telehealth includes many technologies and ways to deliver virtual medical, health, and education services. More than 150 different exhibitors were in attendance. Attendees also had the opportunity to attend over 100 sessions.

I attended sessions including “Technology in Service to Patients and Consumers: Emerging Trends in Virtual Care,” “What Does Artificial Intelligence Have to Do with Population Health?,” and “New Models for Telehealth at Scale: Strategic Telehealth Expansion Initiatives at DoD and VA.” A doctor from Partners Healthcare in Boston discussed four different ways that they are using artificial intelligence to help in the hospital setting. For example, there was some discussion of how a good predictor for when a patient may be re-admitted is if they live alone and have no support systems. It was also interesting to see all the ways the army, navy, airforce, and department of veterans affairs of the U.S. has expanded ways to treat patients without the physician actually seeing them in an office. In particular, the navy discussed how with radiology most of their radiologists are now located in several larger cities in the U.S. and that at some of their sites there is no radiologist. Instead, around 25% to 30% of all the work the radiologists do is for other sites outside of their location. It also seemed that the largest current component for physician patient interactions is using telehealth to deliver behavioral medicine like cognitive behavioral therapy.

Below are some of the pictures I took while at the ATA annual conference in 2018, in Chicago, IL.

ATA18_McCormick_Place_Chicago

ATA18 Hours Exhibits

ATA18_Hall

ATA18_Registration

ATA18_Hall_Sign

ATA_New_Product

ATA18_Sponsor

ATA18_Education_Committee

ATA_Pitch_Jam

ATA18_Itinerary

ATA18_Schedule

American_Telemedicine_Association_Speakers

ATA18_Innovation_Theater

ATA18_Demo_Booth

ATA18_Poster

ATA18_Philips

ATA18_Exhibitor

McCormick_Place_Phillips

ATA18_Honeywell

ATA18_Telmed

ATA_American_Well

ATA18_Arie_Crown_Theatre

ATA18_Session

ATA18_Telemedicine

Chicago_Telemedicine_Drawings

honeywell_ATA18

Alexa_Telemedicine

I was able to attend the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting at McCormick Place in Chicago, IL, which occurred from November 26 to December 1, 2017. The annual meeting is a very large gathering of industry leaders in medical imaging, radiologists, and other related industry professionals. This was the 103rd Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting with the tagline: Explore, Invent, Transform. This year the meeting was heavily focused on topics around machine learning, virtual reality, and 3D printing. Like always, there were lots of exhibitors with many new medical imaging devices ready to discuss and provide demonstrations. There were also interesting plenary sessions, educational courses, and scientific sessions. Furthermore, there were numerous posters and presentations.

A popular feature this year at RSNA, was a deep learning classroom presented by the NVIDIA Deep Learning Institute (DLI), designed for attendees to engage with machine learning tools, write algorithms, and improve their understanding of emerging machine learning technology. In one of these sessions, attendees trained a deep neural network to recognize handwritten digits. In another session, attendees trained convolutional neural networks (CNNs) to create biomarkers to identify the genomics of a disease without the use of an invasive biopsy. In yet another session, attendees segmented magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images to measure parts of the heart.

Another feature this year was a separate section for machine learning showcase exhibitors. This section allowed those interested in machine learning to easily network with those in the field. This section featured a machine learning theatre with presentations from industry leaders. For example, in one presentation, Google Cloud talked about machine learning in imaging and how to build your own models on the cloud. In another presentation, Siemens Healthineers discussed artificial intelligence solutions for clinical decision making by turning medical images into biomarkers to help increase effectiveness of care. There was also a 3D printing theater with many posters and actual 3D printed parts nearby. In addition, there were several virtual reality demos setup to allow attendees to try themselves.

I was able to attend many interesting courses on machine learning, radiomics, 3D printing, virtual reality, and predictive analytics. For example, in one course I attended there was discussion of how to use KNIME to incorporate radiology data sources into predictive modeling and interpret the results and make visualizations. There was an interesting talk in another course I attended about using virtual reality in medical education and how it can greatly decrease the amount of time needed to teach students when compared to PowerPoint presentations. In yet another course I attended, instructors walked attendees through using Mimics and 3-matic from Materialise. In this course participants were taught how to segment out musculoskeletal, body, neurological, and vascular systems from DICOM files into a Standard Tessellation Language (STL) file for use with a 3D printer.

I was also able to attend the plenary session by Michio Kaku titled “The Next 20 Years: How science and technology will revolutionize business, the economy, jobs, and our way of life.” In the talk Dr. Kaku discussed the next wave of wealth generation in our modern economy which he believes is advancements at the molecular level including in artificial intelligence, nanotechnology, and biotechnology linked together by the cloud. He believes that information will be everywhere and computers will become like the word electricity today, where it is not mentioned in language as it is ubiquitous. Dr. Kaku recognized robots will replace jobs in the future but said robots are weak in three areas: 1) pattern recognition, 2) common sense, and 3) human interactions. Thus he believes in many cases artificial intelligent systems will aid humans and not replace them.

Below are some of the pictures I took while at the RSNA annual meeting in 2017, in Chicago, IL.

RSNA McCormick Place

RSNA 2017 Chicago McCormick Place

Welcome RSNA 2017

RSNA South Technical Exhibits

RSNA Learning Center

RSNA Posters

RSNA Cardiac Informatics Machine Learning

RSNA Deep Learning Classroom

RSNA NVIDIA digits

RSNA Virtual Reality

RSNA 3D Printing in Medicine

RSNA 3D Printing Posters

RSNA 3D Imaging in Anatomic Pathology

RSNA 3D Printing Technology

RSNA 3D Printing Schedule

RSNA National Cancer Institute Cancer Imaging Archive

RSNA QIRR Meet the Experts

RSNA Rontgen Reimagined

RSNA Welcome 2017

RSNA Booth Sitting

RSNA Canon Toshiba Medical

RSNA Toshiba

RSNA Machine Learning Google Cloud

RSNA Carestream

RSNA ziehm imaging

RSNA FUJIFILM

RSNA HOLOGIC

RSNA General Electric GE

RSNA Samsung

RSNA HITACHI

RSNA Konica Minolta

RSNA Bayer Angiography

RSNA Siemens Healthineers

RSNA Elsevier

RSNA Philips

RSNA lifeIMAGE

RSNA Next 20 Years

RSNA Michio Kaku

RSNA Tours and Events

RSNA Technical Exhibit Map South

RSNA Technical Exhibit Map North

RSNA 2017 Chicago

RSNA Corporate Partners 2017

RSNA waterfront Chicago

RSNA 2017 Chicago Landscape